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troublemag | December 12, 2018

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Listing State VIC

Ararat Gallery TAMA

Town Hall, Vincent Street, Ararat, 3377

Animalia Australis
19 October 2018 – 20 January 2019

Animalia Australis is an Art Gallery of Ballarat touring exhibition that tells a remarkable story of art in the service of science during a period when Australia was opening up its secrets to the scientific fraternity and to a general public with a marvellous appetite for the weird and wonderful.

These images of the exotic and wildly beautiful things from the upside-down world of the Antipodes reflect the first encounters between white explorers, scientists and settlers with the animals of the Southern Continent, highlighting the prevailing perceptions and depictions of native fauna of the period.

While Indigenous Australians had at least 50,000 years to adapt to and familiarise themselves with the unique flora and fauna of this continent, for Europeans the process took place over little more than 250 years. The name Australia derives from the Latin Terra Australis (the Land of the South) which until the end of the Middle Ages was also ‘incognita’ – unknown and unseen by Europeans and therefore a place where the imagination ran wild.

Australian plants and animals were often shockingly different to anything they had seen before. Black swans were conceived in the imagination of European philosophers before they had ever been seen. The existence of a black as opposed to a white swan was proposed on the grounds that anything coming from the Antipodes — the opposite to the ‘normal’ and ‘known’ world — would be an antithesis to the normal and predictable.

Many of these ‘new’ animals, such as egg-laying mammals, were also simply terrifying. But there was also an exotic and intriguing beauty to be encountered, documented and published. The European settlement of Australia occurred at exactly the time when advances in science meant that people had both the means to describe these new discoveries, and the inspiration and interest to do so.

Australian birds attracted attention from both the scientific world and amateur ornithologists. There were many spectacular Australian birds, of which the parrots are probably the most beautiful, but there were also species which were bizarre either in appearance or behaviour, such as the lyrebird, the cassowary and the emu. It is not surprising that lavishly illustrated publications were produced during the nineteenth century, of which John Gould’s The Birds of Australia is probably the best known.

While many of the works come from the time of first contact by Europeans, others reflect a more systematic approach which prevailed as the scientific community in Australia became more familiar with the continent’s natural history — scientific publications proliferated after the middle of the nineteenth century, as Australian museums competed with each other to publish and describe newly found species.

Victoria, the wealthiest colony, published a set of descriptions of the fauna that could be found within its borders. In compiling it, Frederick McCoy, the Director of Victoria’s Museum of Natural and Applied Sciences, had access to some of the colony’s most talented natural artists, including the German Ludwig Becker and the Swiss Friedrich Schoenfeld. At the Australian Museum in Sydney, the Keepers of Natural History brought out monographs devoted to insects, snakes and mammals, with most of the illustrations being undertaken by the talented sisters Helena and Harriet Scott.

This Art Gallery of Ballarat Exhibition was first seen in Cairns in 2017 and went on show at the Art Gallery of Ballarat in 2018. It draws from the Art Gallery of Ballarat’s extensive collection of images of flora and fauna, and follows the successful exhibition Capturing Flora: 300 years of Australian botanical art, which went on show in Ballarat in 2012 and toured to Cairns, New England and Sydney.

PAUL E MASON: LOOKING FOR BAUDIN – 21st Century Reliquaries Encounter c.1800 Terra Australis – 19 October 2018 – 20 January 2019

“Baudin saw no justification for dispossessing the Tasmanians of their land. His observations of their life and customs had not led him to believe that they would benefit from the çivilizing’influence of the Europeans, as Peron believed the Aborigines of Port Jackson had done.” ‘Encountering Terra Australis’, J Fornasiero and J West-Sooby, 2004

An art exhibition that references the Baudin expedition might lead one to expect realist work influenced by the Enlightenment tradition of the artist scientist. Paul E Mason, however, references another artistic tradition, that of the reliquary. While he eschews the directly religious and spiritual connections of the reliquary, Mason preserves the relic’s symbolic density and concern with veneration and celebration of the object and its link to larger themes. Thus Mason uses gold and gold leaf from Imperial France and diorite from Aboriginal Australia as materials that confer sacred value on otherwise ordinary objects. Mason’s representations of human beings, whether European or Indigenous also eschews the Enlightenment humanism of the Baudin expedition artists. He adopts an archetypal mode of representation that allows us to see a differently patterned colonial encounter. – Gerald Gill, Sociologist, LaTrobe University, 2018

Testament: Robert Salzer Foundation Acquisitions
5 November 2018 – 3 March 2019

The Ararat Gallery collection’s renewal has been significantly supported by the Robert Salzer Foundation. The exhibition presents a decade of acquisitions that reveal the dynamic uptake of textiles in Australia’s contemporary art practise. Building on the gallery’s comprehensive collection of post-minimalist and craft-based textile fibre art from the 1970s and 1980s, these recent acquisitions showcase new and unexpected approaches to the use of textiles as part of a challenging of the hierarchy of materials by contemporary artists.

fifty: Celebrating 50 years of collecting textile art

Established in 1968, Ararat Gallery TAMA has a special place amongst Australia’s public galleries through its commitment to supporting and promoting contemporary practices in textile and fibre art. Today the collection is arguably the most significant of its kind in Australia. This exhibition celebrates the Gallery’s 50th birthday by presenting a selection of the collection’s best-loved works alongside some of its rarely-seen gems.

 
HOURS: Monday to Friday 10am to 4pm, Weekends 10am to 4pm, Closed Good Friday, Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day

Bendigo Art Gallery

42 View Street, Bendigo, Victoria 3550

Bendigo Art Gallery
42 View Street, Bendigo

Frida Kahlo, her photos
Until 10 February 2019

Jessie Boylan: Rupture
Until 10 February 2019

Gothic Beauty: Victorian notions of love, loss and spirituality
Until 10 February 2019

Daughters of the Sun: Christian Waller & Klytie Pate
Until 10 February 2019

Post Office Gallery
61-67 Pall Mall, Bendigo

Vale: mourning, remembrance and Spiritualism in Bendigo 1851-1901
13 December 2018 – 31 March 2019

Bendigo Living Arts Space

Living Arts Space at the Bendigo Visitor Centre, 51-67 Pall Mall

Creative Zest
14 November 2018 – 11 February 2019

A delightful exhibition of work by four artists from Central Victoria including ceramics by Sarah Koschak, artworks by Lynn Twelftree, furniture by Hugh Makin and button craft by Carole Grenfell.

Open 9am-5pm daily (closed Christmas day)

Castlemaine Press

Lot 19, 19 McShanag Drive, Castlemaine 3450

Castlemaine Press AGM
Friday 30 November

All new and existing members are warmly invited to join us for our Annual AGM at 5pm.
And then stay on for our wonderful …

Christmas Print Sale 2018
original . collectable . local . affordable

All prints on sale are by members of Castlemaine Press.

Preview and sale: Friday 30 November, 5pm – 6.30pm

Cocktail hour: Saturday December 1, 5pm – 6pm
Weekend sale opening hours: 1pm – 5pm, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 December

Plus special offer from our sponsor, Union Studio:
20% off framing of prints purchased at the sale.

PRINT STUDIO FOR HIRE

Full members with a good knowledge of printmaking techniques, competence to work by themselves and a proven familiarity with printmaking equipment and studio safety procedures are eligible to hire Castlemaine Press facilities.

All members must complete a free induction session before they are eligible for unsupervised access, with the option of a session working with an experienced studio member if this is considered necessary (fee applies).

JOIN AS A MEMBER …
If you’re not already a paid member, now is a great time to join! 

Members enjoy voting rights, access to community workshop facilities for hire (conditions apply), member discounts and opportunities to participate in collective print practice such as print exchanges and member exhibitions. Not to mention opportunities to collaborate and network with printmakers!

Annual membership fee: Full membership $75, Concession $50, Friends $25. Plus a one-off $20 equipment fee for Full and Concession members. Pro rata fees apply – so contact members@castlemainepress.com.au for details.

If you would like to become a member of Castlemaine Press contact us at castlemainepress@gmail.com

Geelong Gallery

Little Malop Street, Geelong 3220

Treat yourself by visiting the Geelong Gallery, one of Australia’s leading and oldest regional galleries, right in the heart of the city. From iconic colonial masterpieces to compelling contemporary works of art, the Geelong Gallery is the perfect place to unwind and be inspired.

 
There is no there—Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano
until 10 February

 
Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano’s collaborative video works explore the relationship of the body with material objects, space and time. In their recent video work There is no there, they extend their concept of performance to a form of community engagement whereby fellow artists, friends and colleagues enact a series of movements and postures inspired by recent media coverage that wordlessly communicate degrees of urgency, anxiety, enquiry and stillness. There is no there is exhibited alongside preparatory works that provide insights to the video’s development and this new direction in the artists’ practice.   

Akio Makigawa – Water drawing no. 1
until 17 February

Akio Makigawa’s sculptural practice focussed on the essential life-giving elements of water, air, earth and fire. Gifted to Geelong Gallery shortly before the artist’s death in 1999, Water drawing no. 1 comprises several scroll-like drawings, metal channels filled with liquid and a single round stone that allude to the physical and spiritual properties of water.

Recent acquisitions 2017–18
until 17 March

A diverse selection of works that reflect the Gallery’s active acquisition program, and the generosity of a range of valued donors. Includes paintings by Andrew Browne, Richard Larter, Amanda Marburg and Fiona McMonagle; works on paper by Del Kathryn Barton, Charles Blackman, Mike Parr and Jörg Schmeisser; decorative arts by Julie Blyfield and Kirsten Coelho; and video work by Simone Slee.

 
Free entry. Open daily 10am to 5pm.

lot19

19 McShanag Drive , Castlemaine 3450 (off Langslow Street)

lot19 was founded to celebrate life

lot19 is an evolving artspace in the central highlands of Victoria with studio spaces, an outdoor stage, a contemporary art gallery which also presents excellent music, marionette theatre, performance, and film, and an outdoor sculpture park. We are dedicated to promoting undiluted excellence in the full field of human experience, and are not driven by sales.

lot19 highlights include the annual Spring Sculpture Prize:

The lot19 spring sculpture prize has won the hearts of community arts leaders, artists from accomplished to emerging, and many thousands of visitors. There are substantial prizes and the Spring Sculpture Prize attracts an incredibly diverse array of heartfelt and accomplished sculptural works.

Manningham Art Gallery

Manningham City Square (MC²), 687 Doncaster Road, Doncaster 3108

Inspired
28 November – 15 December 2018

Celebrating the creative talent that abounds in the municipality, this annual exhibition by students and tutors of the Manningham Art Studios challenges participants to respond to a theme or concept, either as individual artists fleshing out unique visions, or within class groups, collectively exploring the diverse ways people think about and visualise an idea.

This year’s exhibition is all about that unique feeling of being inspired.

Great art should indeed inspire, yet we often can’t pinpoint what it is precisely about an artwork or an artist’s oeuvre that inspires us. That knowledge only comes from its close inspection, scrutiny of style, form, composition, content and colour. And so Inspired asks participants to do just that, to examine a single work or series, even one quality about an artist’s work ever so closely and to then respond with their own masterpiece – a product of inspiration, but one that may well itself inspire.

National Gallery of Victoria, The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia

180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3000

Hit Steyerl: Factory of the Sun
Until 24 March 2019
FREE ENTRY

The NGV presents German-born, Hito Steyerl’s landmark video installation Factory of the Sun. This is the Australian premiere of this immersive work, which was first shown at the 2015 German Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale.

Steyerl’s work takes the digital image as a point of departure for explorations of the ethics, politics, economics and aesthetics of our digital present in ways both critical and playful. She is one of the most critically acclaimed artists working in the field of video today. As the New York Times writes, Steyerl ‘represents a new paradigm of the artist not as solitary genius but as networked thinker.’

Factory of the Sun is an immersive video which samples different genres of moving image including documentary film, video games, drone surveillance, advertising, news footage, and YouTube dance videos. The video tells the story of workers whose forced actions in a motion capture studio are turned into artificial sunshine. The light produced serves as a metaphor for the light emitted from digital screens, and the electromagnetic frequencies used to transmit information around the globe. Steyerl uses light to point to the ambiguous relationship between individual agency, economic interests and indiscernible power in our technologically mediated age. Shifting between playful and menacing, Factory of the Sun draws viewers into a game-like world that nevertheless reflects contemporary questions.

10am-5pm daily

T:61 3 8620 2222 W:http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au

Newstead Railway Arts Hub

8A Tivey Street

Menagerie: Tegan Wheeldon & Laura Gibbs
Saturday 22 September – Sunday 14 October

Exhibition opening event: 2-4pm, Saturday 22 September

Menagerie is an exhibition of new works by Tegan Wheeldon and Laura Gibbs. The artists utilise methods of printmaking and painting to explore their interest in the natural world, with particular focus on avians and insects. Gibbs’ birds, finely painted in watercolour, are drawn from her immediate environment; the vast countryside and lakes of northern Victoria. Wheeldon utilises techniques of frottage and relief printing to explore a fusion of insect and textile in her mandala-esque compositions. Together these artists weave a menagerie of feathers and antennae, beaks and mandibles, within the exhibition space.

Exhibition hours: 10am – 3pm Friday, Saturday & Sunday

Swan Hill Regional Art Gallery

Horseshoe Bend, Swan Hill 3585

From One to Another
7 December 2018 – 3 February 2019

Suzanne Connelly-Klidomitos, Julie Duffus, Kerryn Finch, Barb Harris, Gloria McKerrow, David McTaggart, Marilyne Nicholls, Paul Oswin, Jules Pilgrim, Shirley Pinchen, Neale Sommersby, Anna Stewart, Anthony Whiting, Marg Wilson

Since time immemorial, students and artists have copied their masters and learnt the skills of observation and techniques employed. Artists are naturally inspired by other artists and their work is often a reflection of that, at times a tangible, or conceptual form.

Fourteen local artists have been asked to choose a work from the collection and respond to it. Works produced by the artists invited and the gallery artworks, will comprise the exhibition.